What’s the Best Programming Language to Learn in 2015?


What’s the Best Programming Language to Learn in 2015?
I’ve been following programming language statistics for several years. There are a number of data sources including code repositories, Q&A discussions, job advertisements, social media mentions, tutorial page visits, learning video views, developer surveys and more. Data is published at different times, none can be considered accurate and all have flaws — but they can be useful for spotting industry trends.
GitHut
GitHut is a relatively new resource which analyzes 2.2 million active repositories on GitHub. The top ten:
JavaScript
Java
Python
CSS
PHP
Ruby
C++
C
Shell
C#
Source: GitHut
RedMonk
RedMonk’s language ranking for 2015 determines popularity by analyzing activity on both GitHub and StackOverflow. Their results:
JavaScript
Java
PHP
Python
C#
C++
Ruby
CSS
C
Objective-C
Credit: RedMonk
Jobs Tractor
Jobs Tractor language trends analyzes many thousands of job postings on Twitter. The latest figures from September 2014:
Java
Objective-C
PHP
SQL
Java (Android)
C#
JavaScript
Python
Ruby
C++
TIOBE Index
The TIOBE Index rates languages on the number of skilled engineers, courses and search engine rankings.
C
Java
C++
Objective-C
C#
JavaScript
PHP
Python
VisualBasic.NET
Visual Basic
Completely Unscientific Meta-Survey Ranking
If we combine these four surveys, we arrive at this result:
Java (all)
JavaScript
PHP
Python
C / C++
C#
Objective-C
Ruby
Visual Basic
I combined C and C++ and ignored CSS and shell scripting. CSS isn’t a programming language as such although preprocessors come close. Shell scripts are useful regardless of whatever technologies you adopt but you won’t find jobs where it’s the only language you need.

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Node.js fork JXcore goes open source, aims for mobile developers


Node.js fork JXcore goes open source, aims for mobile developers
With all the noise surrounding the Io.js variant of Node.js, it’s easy to forget about another Node fork that’s been quietly percolating: JXcore. Last year it added multithreading (of a sort) and the ability to turn Node apps into stand-alone executables — but at the cost of JXcore being a closed source project.

Earlier this week, JXcore’s creators  undid that restriction , declaring JXcore an open source project  and placing it under an MIT-style license. In addition, future editions of JXcore will endeavor to include JavaScript engines — plural — to make Node useful in mobile contexts.

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